New Baby Seewald Details: Jessa Duggar Reportedly Rushed to Hospital During Delivery

The Seewald photo posted this picture of the new family, then deleted it...
The Seewald photo posted this picture of the new family, then deleted it…

Jessa Duggar Seewald delivered a healthy baby boy last night, according to the Duggar family (and Jessa’s sister-in-law, Jessica Seewald, who essentially ruined not only the birth announcement but also the gender reveal last night). This morning, Jessa and her husband Ben Seewald posted the first photos of Baby Boy Seewald to their family’s website. From the photos, which show the baby being held by his grandpa, Jim Bob Duggar, and other family members, it seems that the baby was delivered at Jessa and Ben’s home.

However, according to TMZ, Jessa didn’t exactly get the peaceful home birth she had hoped for. The site reports that Jessa was rushed to the hospital after experiencing problems during her home birth.

Jessa's face when she found out she had to push  that giant baby out of her blessing-maker...
Jessa’s face when she found out she had to push that giant baby out of her blessing-maker…

“We’re told Jessa was taken by ambulance from one of the Duggar homes in Fayetteville, Arkansas, to the local hospital,” TMZ reported. “It’s unclear what happened, but we do know she was trying to do a home birth.”

Baby Boy Seewald weighed in at a whopping 9 lbs., 11 oz. and measured 21 inches long.

Jessa’s labor and delivery sounds a lot like what happened to her older sister, Jill Dillard, when she gave birth to her first child, Israel, in April. Jill had also planned to have a home birth, but ended up having to go to the hospital and get a C-section after enduring over 70 hours of labor. Israel weighed 9 lbs., 10 oz., which is one ounce less than Baby Boy Seewald. (Those Duggar gals certainly know how to create some giant “blessings!”)

It’s no surprise that Jessa had a big baby. After all, she was the largest of the Duggar’s 19 children, weighing in at 9 lbs. 15 oz. at birth. Ben’s mother reported that Ben was also a large baby with a birth weight of 8 lbs. 15 oz.

Jessa and Ben have not yet released their baby’s name. (Ben’s sister Jessica is probably foaming at the mouth to steal the thunder from the name reveal as well!)

To see photos of Baby Seewald, click here!

The birth of Jessa and Ben’s baby (as well as the trip to the hospital) will likely be featured on the upcoming TLC specials starring Jessa and Ben, as well as Jill and her husband Derick Dillard. The specials, called Jill & Jessa: Counting On, will begin airing in December.

UPDATE: According to the 911 call made last night by Jessa’s mom, Michelle Duggar, it appears that Jessa was bleeding heavily after the birth.

“We need her to get checked out…There was quite a bit of blood  when the placenta detached, but uterus is hard now,” an extremely calm Michelle tells the 911 operator, before telling presumably Jessa to “hang in there.”

Michelle assured the operator that the baby was “doing wonderful” as Jessa and others can be heard talking in the background.

(Photos: Seewald Family, TLC)

27 Comments

  1. If you can’t remember how old your daughter is when she just had a birthday, you have too many kids. Jessa is 23 not 24.


    1. Eh, my parents forget how old I am all the time (I am the only living kid they have).

      I feel like it should be if you have to rely on your children to raise your other children, then you have too many. Or, if you can’t fit you and your kids in one, standard vehicle (tops out at like 8 or 9), then you have too many. Or, if it takes you more than 4 second to list their names, you have too damn many kids…ect.


    2. In Michelle’s defence, I only have three children and sometimes I can’t remember their names. LOL! I’m sure she had already planned in her head what she was going to say and the question just threw her off. She may have been a little excited too.


  2. I don’t understand why women do home births. Things can go wrong during childbirth. It’s safer for the mother and child to do a hospital delivery.


    1. The United States has the highest maternal death rate of any developed country. In the US, the most dangerous place to deliver is the hospital.

      Even if they do a hospital birth, women still labor at home before they’re deemed “progressed enough” for admittance.


    2. While stuff can always go wrong, in a normal and non-complicated pregnancy home births are fine. Sometimes hospitals make things more dangerous, which is utterly scary. Look into the world stats and how insurance and doctors schedules mess up labors…I thought the same until I did research.


    3. My local hospital has a 40% cesarean rate. The WHO recommends a rate less than 10% which includes high risk women. Until many things change in our country, birth in hospitals is hardly the safest option for healthy women and babies. I chose a gentle home birth and would do it 100 times over again and again.

      I have a low pubic bone and it took 14 hours after being fully dilated for my daughter to descend past it. She was in no distress, we just needed time that doctors would not have allowed. So thankful for my midwives and their trust in my body!

      Good job Jessa!


  3. So… someone in a cult had a baby. Let’s all worship it as though there weren’t hundreds of thousands of other babies born that day. They are the lucky ones though. They don’t have to look forward to the child abuse known as “blanket training” starting when they are 6 months old, and they may have a chance to get an education and a normal life. Sleep well little Seewald child, your life is going to be sad.


      1. It’s a horrific, and unnecessary, form of child abuse. The baby is sat upon a blanket and the “trainer” tries to lead the baby off the blanket. Once the try to leave the blanket, they beat the child. They keep doing this until the child, under any circumstances, refuses to leave he blanket.


        1. Remember, it’s ‘ungodly’ to strike your child fewer than six times. (I really wish I was kidding.)
          Pity my wayward father who realized three (open-handed on the buttocks and non mark-leaving for an offense neither of us quite remember but that I understood I was being punished for) smacks in that I had too high of a pain threshold for it to work and whatever it was definitely wasn’t worth belting a preschooler over.
          Between that, ‘government’ school, devil/secular music, a mother that worked *outside* the home, and general pants-wearing, I was screwed.


  4. “Blessing-Maker”? Hahaha! Funniest thing I’ve seen today.
    On a side note, I wonder what it’s like to go from a virgin, to not a virgin, to giving birth in less than a year. I’d feel sorry for these girls if not for the fact that they choose to do this.


          1. How about having no experience what so ever, including frontal hugs or a real date? Being molested as a child doesn’t count as experience.


        1. She said she’d “feel sorry” for them if it wasn’t their choice to lose their virginity and become pregnant straight away.


          1. I got the impression that it was more because of how overwhelming it had the potential to be. Going from not being allowed to kiss to newlywed to mother of a newborn in just over a year *is* quite a bit of change; good, bad or indifferent.


      1. I would not want to legally bind myself to someone without first knowing that my husband-to-be can find my clitorous and can give me a good rogering.

        I find the thought of going from not even kissing or frontal hugging to full on intercourse in, what, 30 minutes, disgusting and weird.


  5. poor things, suffering for days in horrible pain to try and please daddy, whose never pushed a watermelon from a lemon. freakin’ asshole.


  6. I hope I don’t sound like the grammar police because your articles are typically always on point, but in the heading just wanted to let u know it should be spelled delivery

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